LIght

“The heavens are telling of the glory of God; and their expanse is declaring the work of His hands. Day to day pours forth speech, And night to night reveals knowledge.” —  Psalm 19:1-2

“The heavens are telling of the glory of God; and their expanse is declaring the work of His hands. Day to day pours forth speech, And night to night reveals knowledge.”

 Psalm 19:1-2

July 20 marked the 50th anniversary of man’s first steps on the moon. These steps were taken by American astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin respectively. It was a feat no other nation has accomplished.

As my husband and I watched one of the documentaries that commemorated the event, I became awestruck by the historic footage of the moon’s harsh environment.

It was dark, motionless and dusty. It was drab and colorless. It appeared to be suffocating and uninhabitable. Aside from the intrusion of the well-insulated astronauts, it was silent and lifeless.

Armstrong said it had “a stark beauty.” Aldrin referred to it as a “magnificent desolation.”

In the beginning, on day four, God said it was good.

During a recent interview with NBC News, a spokeswoman for the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles spoke of a new discovery. The findings refute the previously held theory that the moon was more ancient than the earth. Science now attests the moon was formed “shortly after the earth was.”

In the beginning, on day three, God created the earth. On day four, He set the moon in the sky.

God appointed it to illumine the earth by night, to be as a sign, and to mark the seasons, days, and years. (Gen 1:14-18) And so it does — and so it will continue to do so — until He bids it to cease.

On day six, God beheld His completed creation and He elevated His assessment to “very good.” Beauty is heightened by the fulfillment of purpose.

The moon possesses an inherent loveliness, by the virtue of its Creator, as it shines suspended in the night sky. On its surface, an unparalleled splendor emerges out of a focused discharge of duties: to reflect light upon the earth and to serve as history’s timepiece.

One day — I believe it to be soon — God will bid the moon to cease shining (Mt.m 24:29, Mk. 13:24, Lk. 21:25), and bid it to turn to blood. (Acts 2:20, Rev. 6:12, 8:12). Time as we know it will stop and eternity will begin.

Centuries before Sir Isaac Newton discovered the moon’s gravitational effects on the oceans and seas, the Lord Jesus spoke these words:

“There will be signs in sun and moon and stars, and on the earth dismay among nations, in perplexity at the roaring of the sea and the waves, men fainting from fear and the expectation of the things which are coming upon the world; for the powers of the heavens will be shaken. Then they will see the Son of Man coming in a cloud with power and great glory.” Luke 21:25-27

Signs are devices used to direct us to things we need to know or to actions we need to take. It is shear lunacy not to observe them. To say we did not know is simply howling at the moon.

STACY KEELIN may be reached at shadowsoflight@zoom.email