SUMMIT Work on the new Boyd County Animal Shelter has been halted due to specific parts of the building not meeting code regulations. As a result, the shelter requires a restart.

Boyd County Judge-Executive Eric Chaney said the new shelter, which was erected by the county’s maintenance and construction crew, will need to be completely torn down to its frame and rebuilt to code.

“It’s the definition of government inefficiency. This was a waste of taxpayer money,” Chaney said. “Once we get it done, it'll be done right. It'll be a beautiful building for years to come.”

Chaney said there were code issues with the metal, installation issues with water damage, foundation issues and plumbing and electrical problems.

“I don't think this was done with bad intentions,” Chaney said. “The original intention was to save taxpayer money and do this in house, but we don’t have the manpower or capabilities to do such a thing.”

Chaney said once the building is tore down to the frame, they’ll pursue a contractor to complete the work. The work will entail more than the $30,000 threshold and will be placed out for public bid. There is no current timeline on when the project will be placed for bid.

“Sometimes, especially in government, it is more cost-effective to contract out the work and get it done in a timely manner,” Chaney said. Chaney said that once the county has estimates from contractors, the anticipated cost will be released to the public.

The total project budget is $235,366 — $75,000 was added to the 2019-20 county budget to complete it. The county initially contributed $50,000 to the project and the City of Ashland contributed $25,000. Nancy McClellan, a late philanthropist, also willed the shelter $50,000.

Once the new shelter is finished, Chaney said the old shelter will be sold.

Groundbreaking of the 5,300-square-foot facility took place in December 2017 and was planned under the previous fiscal court elected officials.

The shelter, located at 1021 Bob McCullough Dr., will feature 52 kennels (10 designated for isolation), 22 outside runs, a 1-acre fenced yard allowing animals the opportunity to exercise, visitation and exam rooms, a management office, cat/puppy areas, a drive-in garage for unloading, a large reception area, staff locker/lunch rooms and a record retention room.

(606) 326-2654 |

ccarver@dailyindependent.com

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