Daily Independent (Ashland, KY)

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July 2, 2014

New state laws go into effect July 15

FRANKFORT — Victims of domestic violence in Kentucky will soon be allowed fast access to concealed carry gun permits while voters from precincts surrounding state parks in dry counties will be able to vote to allow alcohol sales.

Those are two measures passed in the 2014 General Assembly and among roughly 100 laws which go into effect on July 15.

The Kentucky constitution provides that new laws take effect 90 days after the adjournment of the legislature each year. Exceptions are general appropriation bills and any bill that contains an emergency clause allowing it to become effective immediately upon the signature of the governor.

House Bill 128 will let those victims of domestic violence who have been granted an emergency protective order or domestic violence order to obtain a provisional concealed carry permit in just a single business day. They would have to undergo the same background checks and applications requirements as anyone seeking a concealed carry permit — but domestic violence victims would be granted up to 45 days to complete required firearms training.

Typically applicants for the licenses must complete the training before receiving the permit, but the idea of HB 128 is that such victims’ lives may be in immediate danger and they shouldn’t have to wait 45 days. However, to retain their permits even victims of domestic violence would have to complete the training — or surrender their permits.

House Bill 475 allows voters near state park lodges and golf courses located in dry counties to vote on liquor-by-the-drink at the park facilities. Supporters believe it will increase visitors to state parks. Package sales aren’t included.

The General Assembly also passed a bill this spring to allow the use of CBD oil, extracted from hemp and marijuana, to be prescribed by university research hospitals to treat child seizures. The measure, sponsored by Sen. Julie Denton, R-Louisville, was hailed as a major victory by parents of children suffering severe seizures caused by epilepsy and other syndromes.

While the law went into effect immediately with an emergency clause, the hospitals have encountered obstacles in obtaining the substances in forms suitable for use and the parents’ hopes for helping their children has again been delayed.

Senate Bill 98, sponsored by Sen. Sara Beth Gregory, R-Monticello, creates an adult abuse registry to help employers identify any prospective caregiver employee with a history of substantiated adult abuse or neglect.

The “Boater Freedom Act” requires boating enforcement officers first to have a reasonable suspicion of wrongdoing before they can board or inspect a boat. It was sponsored by Sen. Chris Girdler, R-Somerset.

October will now be designated Anti-Bullying Month in Kentucky thanks to students from Madison Middle School. After two years of lobbying the General Assembly to pass such a measure, Madison County lawmakers Rep. Rita Smart, D-Richmond, and Sen. Jared Carpenter, R-Berea, succeeded in pushing the bill through.

Other laws which take effect on July 15 are:

‰House Bill 232 requires businesses to alert their customers if their personal data may have been breached;

‰Advanced Practice Registered Nurses will be allowed to prescribe some medications without a collaborative agreement with physicians;

‰A bill to tighten rules on what lobbyists or interest groups from buying food or drink for lawmakers or paying for out-of-state travel for the lawmaker;

‰A bill to allow school staff trained by medical professionals to administer emergency administration of insulin to students;

‰HB 90 will require parents or guardians to accompany drivers under 18 to court appearances for traffic violations;

‰SB 225 outlaws a practice called “up-skirting” — use of a cell phone to take pictures from below a woman’s skirt or dress;

‰SB 213 allows Sunday alcohol sales at small farm wineries if the sales are authorized by the local fiscal court — or a local option election.

RONNIE ELLIS writes for CNHI News Service and is based in Frankfort. Reach him at rellis@cnhi.com. Follow CNHI News Service stories on Twitter at www.twitter.com/cnhifrankfort.

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Paul and Kristen Shively at their new shop, Phoenix Vapors, on 16th Street in downtown Ashland.

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