Daily Independent (Ashland, KY)

Opinion

September 10, 2013

In Your View

ASHLAND — World War II vets, merit attention

I attended the opening ceremony of the LST-325 ship that was docked in Ashland. In attendance was a Congressional Medal of Honor recipient and at least seven Navy World War II veterans who made a special effort to attend this ceremony.

To my surprise, the picture in the newspaper the next day was not of the World War II veterans but of a local politician. In a few years, there won’t be any World War II veterans left, but we will always be blessed with politicians.

Here are a few reasons why this country is so great:

--It is the veteran, not the preacher, who has given us the freedom of religion.

--It is the veteran, not the reporter, who has given us the freedom of the press.

--It is the veteran, not the poet, who has given us freedom of speech.

--It is the veteran, not the campus organizer, who has given us the freedom to assemble.

--It is the veteran, not the lawyer, who has given us the right to a fair trial.

--It is the veteran, not the politician, who has given us the right to vote.

Whenever World War II veterans are together, they should always be the center of attention, not the politician.

Ray Caudill, Ashland



Massie will do the right thing

Our nation is in dire need of creative thinkers and common-sense people in leadership roles. I believe Ashland is blessed with one such leader, U.S. Rep. Thomas Massie, who represents the 4th Congressional District in Kentucky.  It is clear Massie has backbone to stand up to the Washington status quo which is broken. His problem-solving ideas bring a refreshing, down-to-Earth intelligence that seems to be in short supply in current politics.

I believe Representative Massie is driven to do the right thing and work hard, even in a bipartisan way. He strikes me as someone who will put principle above party and character above compromise.

 Our country is in a great moral crisis. Our government is out of step with the laws of God and nature. We must continue to fight for what is right. Our country’s circumstances are too serious and stakes too high to sit silently with hope that our leaders will see the error of their ways.

Massie has stressed in recent town halls and newspaper interviews that our calls, letters and emails do make a difference. He gives us hope that constituents can still have a voice in the direction of our country.  When enough people rise up and take action on a substantive level, in prayer, thought and action, we will see a new hope for ur country.

Please speak up and contact your local, state and national leaders and let them know where you stand on issues. You can find contact information for all your leaders on the internet, including Representative Massie’s local Ashland office. Thomas Jefferson said, “All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.” We must not be silent!

 Sonya O’Brien, Ashland

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Opinion
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    April 13, 2014

  • 'Waited too long'

    Lt. Garlin Murl Conner left the U.S. Army as the second-most decorated soldier during World War II, earning four Silver Stars, four Bronze Stars, seven Purple Hearts and the Distinguished Service Cross for his actions during 28 straight months in combat.

    April 12, 2014

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    April 11, 2014

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    April 4, 2014

  • In Your View

    Letters to the editor

    April 3, 2014

  • Time runs out

    Two bills proposed by House Majority Leader Rocky Adkins and designed to boost the economy of this region have apparently died in the Kentucky Senate after being approved by the House of Representatives. Despite easily being approved by the Democratic-controlled House, neither bill was even brought up for a vote by the Republican-controlled Senate.

    April 2, 2014

  • Time runs out

    Two bills proposed by House Majority Leader Rocky Adkins and designed to boost the economy of this region have apparently died in the Kentucky Senate after being approved by the House of Representatives. Despite easily being approved by the Democratic-controlled House, neither bill was even brought up for a vote by the Republican-controlled Senate.

    April 2, 2014

  • Dismal numbers

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    April 2, 2014