Daily Independent (Ashland, KY)

Opinion

June 5, 2013

In Your View

ASHLAND — ‘No’ vote would restrict potential

As a resident of Grayson, I am frequently puzzled by those among us who wish to restrict our little town's potential.

The so-called Citizens for Positive Progress have been quite busy posting signs all over town encouraging everyone to vote “no” in the June 11 special election. Their argument appears to be that it will encourage alcoholism and drunk driving among our residents.

 Well, I’ve got news for you, folks. Regardless of whether it’s sold here or in one of our neighboring counties, those who want to drink will drink. And yes, some of them will get behind the wheel.

But the idea that keeping Grayson “dry” will somehow insulate us from that danger is faulty thinking.  Just look at the news of record section in the Grayson Journal-Times.  Last week alone there were no less than 15 charges related to driving under the influence.

Meanwhile, our neighboring counties collect our money and use it for the benefit of their residents. Please, folks, think about the businesses that we could attract and the jobs that will come with them.  An economically healthy Grayson is in our best interest, too.

Furthermore, the revenue collected from the sale of alcohol could be used for other worthy projects.  Personally, I’d like to see it fund a long-overdue recycling program (which could also generate income for the city).

Finally, to those who feel compelled to vote “no” for religious reasons:  My goodness, even Jesus enjoyed a glass of wine with dinner once in a while.

Susan Durisoe, Grayson

Ashland needs curbside recycling

I was concerned to read recently that the recycling bins may be removed, but the fact is as I get older it is harder to get to them.

However, when I recycle I have a third less the amount of garbage for pick up than I do when I don’t recycle. I think we must have curbside recycling. It is the responsible thing to do. It would be nice if the city could profit from the recycling program and apply that to keeping our utility rates down, but it is time it became mandatory for everyone.

Erica Francks, Ashland

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