Daily Independent (Ashland, KY)

Opinion

November 10, 2013

In Your View

ASHLAND — Honor and pray for our veterans

The U.S. Constitution, the supreme law of the land, has granted us freedom of speech, religion and the right to bear arms. The first three articles of this great document spell out the separation of powers (legislative, consisting of the Senate and the House of Representatives); executive (the president) and judicial (the Supreme Court), therefore preventing one power from ruling over the other powers.

Fast forward to 2013. We need to ask ourselves if we are still abiding by the laws that were set up to make our nation as intended or whether we are in violation of the system of checks and balances.  Are the people to represent us listening to us and protecting and upholding our “certain unalienable rights, that among these are life,liberty and the pursuit of happiness?”  Is this nation performing as a democracy or is it moving toward a monarchy or dictatorship?

Like so many other men and women,  my husband (now deceased) took the oath to serve and defend this nation. Following his service in the Alaskan earthquake, he was an engineer fighting in harm’s way in Vietnam and taught English to the Vietnamese. Today he would find it difficult believing what is taking place in our government.   He loved our country and our state where he was born and died. But mostly he loved God, his family and friends.

In honor of our veterans who have given their best to serve our nation, I urge you to pray for them and thank them for their service. It is they who deserve our eternal respect. Pray also for those who lead our country and world. Freedom is not free.

Etta Jane McCarty, Morehead

Ali: From hero to draft dodger

I love John Cannon’s writings. He writes about things of my generation and I identify with a lot of the articles he writes. I still have the article he wrote sometime back about being disappointed by one of his sports heroes, Pete Rose. I remember Pete well.

This took me back to a cold night in 1964. Wade Everman and I were sitting in an old 1950s model car drinking illegal beer and listening to Cassius Clay beat Sonny Liston for the heavyweight championship of world. We were ecstatic! Kentucky had never in our lifetime had any kind of championship boxer and this was the big package! We were very proud, slapped hands and cheered for Cassius Clay.

Now, fast forward a few years. Wade and I and most of the able-bodied men in Carter County were in the military service and most of us were in Vietnam.

Cassius Clay, on the other hand, changed his name to Muhammed Ali and ran to Europe to avoid military service. Take Vietnam out of the equation because the Army had a program that if you signed up you could pick your duty station and avoid Vietnam. This program was real because I know several men who did it. Cassius Clay was just having too good of a time with his big money and notoriety to serve his country for a few years, and that is a fact.

You talk about being disappointed in a sports hero! Cassius Clay went from being one of Kentucky’s biggest heroes to just another wealthy draft dodger. They are a dime a dozen.

Personally, I think Wade Everman, Bruce Everman, Mike Cook, Tony Pope, Kip Littleton, and all the other veterans in Carter County ought to be signing autographs in parking lots and have their names put on a plaque in Frankfort.

Muhammed Ali ought to be living in Europe eating plum pudding and bratwurst since that is where he ran to while the war was going on, and I think he should have plenty of company. Nuff said!         

 Randall K. McGlone, Grayson

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Opinion
  • What's next?

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  • 'Waited too long'

    Lt. Garlin Murl Conner left the U.S. Army as the second-most decorated soldier during World War II, earning four Silver Stars, four Bronze Stars, seven Purple Hearts and the Distinguished Service Cross for his actions during 28 straight months in combat.

    April 12, 2014

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  • In Your View

    Letters to the editor

    April 3, 2014

  • Time runs out

    Two bills proposed by House Majority Leader Rocky Adkins and designed to boost the economy of this region have apparently died in the Kentucky Senate after being approved by the House of Representatives. Despite easily being approved by the Democratic-controlled House, neither bill was even brought up for a vote by the Republican-controlled Senate.

    April 2, 2014

  • Time runs out

    Two bills proposed by House Majority Leader Rocky Adkins and designed to boost the economy of this region have apparently died in the Kentucky Senate after being approved by the House of Representatives. Despite easily being approved by the Democratic-controlled House, neither bill was even brought up for a vote by the Republican-controlled Senate.

    April 2, 2014

  • Dismal numbers

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