Daily Independent (Ashland, KY)

Opinion

October 7, 2013

In Your View

ASHLAND — Column mostly free of facts

This is in response to Carrie Stambaugh’s Oct. 4 column headlined “The tea party and The Fear.” 

In this unfortunate and largely fact-free column, the author seems intent upon parroting what we have already heard from the majority of the national media. (Full disclosure here: I am not a member of the Tea Party and have no desire to join it.)

But let’s just take a look at some inconvenient truths. First of all, the Tea Parties were a reaction to two basic concerns:

(1) The seemingly inexorable encroachment of the federal government into our lives.

(2) The accompanying unsustainable increases in federal spending.

Initially, the Parties were met with amusement and derision from Congressional Progressives and their enablers in the national media. However, when the Progressives realized that they could not debate the Parties solely on the facts, they decided, instead, to resort to the full-throated invective that we have seen for the past two years, which has culminated in the crescendo of name calling that we see today.

The cries of “anarchists,” “terrorists,” “jihadists,” and the ever popular canard “racists” have become the coin of the realm for Progressives in their fight against those pesky Tea Partiers. (The author of this column did her part with her characterizations of an “incoherent frenzy,” “fear mongering” and “muddied rhetoric.”)

Although the author is probably impervious to facts, I would like to mention something that she apparently neglected. Though she boldly states that “…the law has made its way now through all three branches of government…” does’nt it appear just a bit odd that the executive branch of our government has made numerous exemptions for administration cronies?

In short, the author is little more than a microcosm of our national media.  Instead of a factual accounting of the real issues at stake they have simply mirrored the demagoguery of Congress.  And, for that, shame on them.

SMSgt Skip Crabtree,  USAF (Ret.), Russell

 

Expect rebellion at ballot box

I remind everyone, especially those that get their news from the back of a milk carton or something, that it isn't the House of Representatives that is spending money to keep World War II veterans out of the memorial. It isn’t John Bohner who closed the Vietnam War Memorial (a granite, outdoor slab) and it was not Ted Cruz who closed parts of a highway so people could not even stop and take pictures of Mr. Rushmore from the highway.

No one in Congress is evicting 80-year-old people from their homes just because a road they cross is part of the National Park system. Yep, it was your good ol’ President.

You may think these things are cute but there is a rebellion brewing in this country. It will not be an armed one but rather a wholesale slaughter of political careers at the ballot box.

Then we will hear wailing and gnashing of teeth from both sides of these hog trough fed elite. I cannot wait for that day.

Gaylord Cooper, South Shore

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