Daily Independent (Ashland, KY)

Opinion

May 7, 2013

In Your View

ASHLAND — Restrictions at dams protested

As an angler I was disturbed to read in The Independent that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers wants to put up barricades and security guards to keep anglers from accessing areas below dams around Kentucky.

As one who never feels we need a law for everything, I support legislation to keep these areas open to the public if that’s what it takes.

A story dated May 1 indicates the Kentucky Division of Fish & Wildlife sold a record number of fishing licenses for April. Instead of closing these areas, we need to find more ways to open them up to bring in the almighty tourism dollars these rural areas so desperately need.

I encourage our own U.S. Rep. Thomas Massie to support U.S. Rep Ed Whitfield’s “Freedom to Fish Act” being considered. I encourage all anglers to contact the Corps of Engineers at (615) 736-7161 and let them know you want to continue fishing where you always have.

Tom Clay, president, Kentucky Outdoor Press Association

Crabbe teachers work long hours

As Teacher Appreciation Week is approaching, I express my observations of Crabbe Elementary School.

The professionals at this school spend many hours during their “summer vacations” preparing their classrooms and teaching strategies for the students they will be educating each year. 

Crabbe Elementary teachers spend many hours in collaboration with each other. These sessions help plan strategies on how to teach their students individually and collectively.

All of the teachers at Crabbe must be involved in many professional development sessions outside of school because of the constant changes taking place in the education profession. Kudos to these teachers at Crabbe for taking time away from their families to attend these sessions.

Many veteran teachers with 20-plus years of experience didn’t have the advantage as students themselves to work with advanced computer technology. They have had to spend many hours outside of school to practice these skills on the job.

To their credit, they have kept up with the changes that seem to be happening every year and implement this technology with their daily instruction.

All of the teachers have had to deal with behavior problems that disrupt the learning process. They have dealt with these situations in a professional manner.

 Many of the teachers at Crabbe are involved in extracurricular activities that take more time away from their personal lives. Despite the pressure of spring assessments, the Crabbe staff shows love and care for each student, but also lets students know they must give their best effort.

Every staff member at Crabbe has the necessary skills to be successful at higher paying jobs with less pressure. I am so thankful each one of them chose the teaching profession. The children of Crabbe will benefit greatly!

Bryan Fleming, Crabbe teacher, Ashland

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Opinion
  • What's next?

    While virtually all cities in northeastern Kentucky provide their residents with some utility services — water and sewer, mainly, and sometimes natural gas — to the best of our knowledge, Olive Hill is the only town in the FIVCO‚Äąregion with its own electrical company.
     

    April 13, 2014

  • 'Waited too long'

    Lt. Garlin Murl Conner left the U.S. Army as the second-most decorated soldier during World War II, earning four Silver Stars, four Bronze Stars, seven Purple Hearts and the Distinguished Service Cross for his actions during 28 straight months in combat.

    April 12, 2014

  • Enact HB 3

    The National Rx Drug Abuse Summit is under way hundreds of miles from eastern Kentucky in Orlando, Fla., but the three-day conference which runs through Thursday, was organized by Operation UNITE, the eastern Kentucky anti-drug group that knows all too well the devastating impact the prescription drug epidemic continues to have on this region.

    April 11, 2014

  • State officials cease efforts to stop advance of ash borer

    Kentucky’s war against the tiny emerald ash borer responsible for already killing more than 25 million ash trees in the eastern United States has ended in surrender — by state officials, not the tiny insect.

    April 8, 2014

  • Demise of apparel industry in Kentucky continues

    The steady demise of the once thriving clothing industry in small Kentucky towns continues with the latest factory to announce it is shutting down being one of the largest: Fruit of the Loom has announced it is closing its last remaining plant in Jamestown, a move that eventually will see the elimination of more than 600 jobs in the small town near Lake Cumberland.

    April 7, 2014

  • None on ballot

    The 2014 Kentucky General Assembly considered an unusually high number of proposed amendments to the Kentucky Constitution on such issues as casino gambling, the restoration of voting rights for convicted felons and the elimination of state and local elected offices.

    April 4, 2014

  • In Your View

    Letters to the editor

    April 3, 2014

  • Time runs out

    Two bills proposed by House Majority Leader Rocky Adkins and designed to boost the economy of this region have apparently died in the Kentucky Senate after being approved by the House of Representatives. Despite easily being approved by the Democratic-controlled House, neither bill was even brought up for a vote by the Republican-controlled Senate.

    April 2, 2014

  • Time runs out

    Two bills proposed by House Majority Leader Rocky Adkins and designed to boost the economy of this region have apparently died in the Kentucky Senate after being approved by the House of Representatives. Despite easily being approved by the Democratic-controlled House, neither bill was even brought up for a vote by the Republican-controlled Senate.

    April 2, 2014

  • Dismal numbers

    The good news is that the health ratings of all but two area counties improved in the latest ranking of the state’s 120 counties. However, before we pat ourselves on the back for those improvements, the overall health of residents of counties in northeast Kentucky remains rather dismal. Yes, we are improving but we still have a long, long way to go.

    April 2, 2014