Daily Independent (Ashland, KY)

Opinion

February 6, 2013

In Your View

ASHLAND — 2nd Amendment not about hunting

The Second Amendment was put in the United States Constitution to protect the God-given rights of American citizens from the prospect of a one day tyrannical government. The Second Amendment has nothing to do with protecting the rights of hunters.

Why do we tolerate President Obama and his administration to arm dubious rebels in foreign lands with assault weapons to fight their governments while the United States government is intent on taking these kinds of weapons away from law-abiding citizens in this country?

Some of the new laws being pushed in Congress and by President Obama with his executive orders would require our local police to confiscate certain firearms from law-abiding citizens right here in America.

As Patrick Henry proclaimed: “Are we at last brought to such a humiliating and debasing degradation, that we cannot be trusted with arms for our own defense? Where is the difference between having our arms in our own possession and under our own direction, than having them under the management of Congress? If our defense be the real object of having those arms, in whose hands can they be trusted with more propriety, or equal safety to us, as in our own hands?”

James Kunkel, Warsaw

30 percent tax rate looks good

The Fair Tax Act proposes a tax on all new merchandise and services in place of all income taxes, payroll taxes, corporation taxes and taxes on dividends, interest, and capital gains. Critics of the act, which proposes a 23 percent inclusive tax, have confused the issue by saying that this law is in reality a 30 percent tax. To clear up this misinformation, consider the following explanation.

The 23 percent tax is included in the stated price of each item or service. Thus for a $100 item, $23 goes for taxes, and the remaining $77 pays the cost of the item.

This is the same as saying that if you are in the 25 percent income tax bracket for every $100 you earn, $25 goes for taxes and you keep $75. On the other hand if you divide $23 by $77 you come up with a 30 percent tax, but to be fair, your income tax rate by this same method would be calculated by dividing $25 by $75, which is 33 percent. And if you add in your $7.65 payroll tax for social security, you now pay $32.65 and keep $67.35, which is really a 48.5 percent tax. Thus the 30 percent Fair Tax rate looks good.

Patrick R. Burkett, Bend, Ore.

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Opinion
  • PAUL CHITWOOD: Ruling on same-sex marriage defies state constitution

    News that U.S. District Judge John G. Heyburn once again usurped the will of Kentucky voters is tragic and disappointing. By declaring gay marriage legal in the commonwealth, Heyburn defied the essential, foundational governing document that ensures order and justice, the Constitution of Kentucky.

    July 8, 2014

  • More difficult

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    May 22, 2014

  • Primary election sends messages

    The voters — or at least the minority who took the time to go to the polls Tuesday — have spoken, with Boyd County voters sending mixed messages in the county-wide races that gathered the most attention.

    May 21, 2014

  • Click it or Ticket

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    May 21, 2014

  • Top trooper

    Thumbs up to Trooper First Class Shane Goodall of Flatwoods for being named 2013 Trooper of the Year for Kentucky.

    May 20, 2014

  • 05/18/2014 — This Week in the Tri-State

    Local news

    May 18, 2014

  • Magolene S. Fraley 1929-2014

    Magolene Spears Fraley, 84, of Wurtland, died Saturday in Community Hospice Care Center in Ashland.

    May 17, 2014

  • Business grant

    Morehead State graduate student Kayla Keeton, who received her undergraduate degree from MSU last spring and is now studying for her MBA at the school, has received a $5,111 grant from the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development to help her start Belles of the Bluegrass, a high-tech wedding planning business.

    May 16, 2014

  • Recovery Fest celebrates kicking addiction

    The wet weather no doubt impacted the size of the crowd at Saturday’s Recovery Fest 2014 at Veterans Riverfront Park in Ashland, but there were plenty of reasons for addicts who are now drug free to celebrate and for speakers like State Sen. Robin Webb, D-Grayson, and others to talk about the impact the prescription drug epidemic has had on this region and for others to distribute literature and offer words of encouragement that could convince some to seek help in their battle with their drug addictions.

    May 13, 2014

  • In Your View 5/13/14

    Letters to the editor:

    May 13, 2014