Daily Independent (Ashland, KY)

Opinion

June 9, 2013

In Your View

ASHLAND — 2 science stories speak of a God

 Two science stories appeared side by side in the paper last week. One, a complete well-preserved 10,000 year-old wooly mammoth was found in the arctic. Two, a 60 million year-old dinosaur fossil also found, believed a precursor of what became modern day birds.

We think of mammoths and saber tooth tigers and several other extinct animals as prehistoric creatures.

Then how are we humans, who are fortunate to live 100 years, to grasp the concept of 10 thousand or 1 million, or 6 million or 60 million years of unrecorded history? We cannot. It is beyond our comprehension.

And if these facts boggle our finite minds, how are we to comprehend the thousands or millions or billions of other planets, suns, and galaxies that span infinite time and space.

It occurs to me that this brief survey of these few facts, not even mentioning every tree that exists or has existed, every blade of grass, every grain of sand or every fish in the ocean, all speak of a God we all need to acknowledge and thank and worship. Think about it. “The fool has said in his heart there is no God...”

Robert L. Caummisar, Grayson

Gun control now called gun safety

Big Brother is alive and well and living at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. The latest Orwellian double-speak is the use of the phrase “gun-safety” as a euphemism for gun-control.

The most telling point in this situation even needs a euphemism. The anti-gunners have to use a euphemism because the phrase gun-control is distasteful to many Americans.

The NRA, often refered to only as the gun lobby, is actually much more. The NRA trains firearms instructors for law enforcement, teaches gun-safety courses, and defends “the right to keep and bear arms.”

The first gun-control laws were “Jim Crow” laws prohibiting African-Americans from owing firearms. These laws were passed at the behest of the KKK. The NRA went to bat for the African-Americans and got those biased laws repealed.

I’ve handled firearms all my life and, according to the U.S. Army, am a qualified small-arms expert. When I was a boy I learned the 10 commandments of gun safety.

1. Keep guns and ammunition out of the reach of children.

2. Children should never be allowed to handle firearms without adult supervision.

3. Never play with guns, always remember they are deadly weapons.

4. Assume every gun is loaded until you know it is not.

5. Never aim a gun at anything you do not intend to destroy.

6. Always be sure your backstop will stop a bullet.

7. When shooting keep the muzzle pointed down range at all times.

8. When hunting always be aware of where your gun is pointed.

9. Never shoot over water as bullets can ricochet off the surface.

10. Never cross a fence with a loaded gun.

Now when someone tries to confuse you with Orwellian double speak about “gun safety” you can tell them you already know the 10 commandments of real gun/safety.

Steven Little, Ashland

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Opinion
  • What's next?

    While virtually all cities in northeastern Kentucky provide their residents with some utility services — water and sewer, mainly, and sometimes natural gas — to the best of our knowledge, Olive Hill is the only town in the FIVCO region with its own electrical company.
     

    April 13, 2014

  • 'Waited too long'

    Lt. Garlin Murl Conner left the U.S. Army as the second-most decorated soldier during World War II, earning four Silver Stars, four Bronze Stars, seven Purple Hearts and the Distinguished Service Cross for his actions during 28 straight months in combat.

    April 12, 2014

  • Enact HB 3

    The National Rx Drug Abuse Summit is under way hundreds of miles from eastern Kentucky in Orlando, Fla., but the three-day conference which runs through Thursday, was organized by Operation UNITE, the eastern Kentucky anti-drug group that knows all too well the devastating impact the prescription drug epidemic continues to have on this region.

    April 11, 2014

  • State officials cease efforts to stop advance of ash borer

    Kentucky’s war against the tiny emerald ash borer responsible for already killing more than 25 million ash trees in the eastern United States has ended in surrender — by state officials, not the tiny insect.

    April 8, 2014

  • Demise of apparel industry in Kentucky continues

    The steady demise of the once thriving clothing industry in small Kentucky towns continues with the latest factory to announce it is shutting down being one of the largest: Fruit of the Loom has announced it is closing its last remaining plant in Jamestown, a move that eventually will see the elimination of more than 600 jobs in the small town near Lake Cumberland.

    April 7, 2014

  • None on ballot

    The 2014 Kentucky General Assembly considered an unusually high number of proposed amendments to the Kentucky Constitution on such issues as casino gambling, the restoration of voting rights for convicted felons and the elimination of state and local elected offices.

    April 4, 2014

  • In Your View

    Letters to the editor

    April 3, 2014

  • Time runs out

    Two bills proposed by House Majority Leader Rocky Adkins and designed to boost the economy of this region have apparently died in the Kentucky Senate after being approved by the House of Representatives. Despite easily being approved by the Democratic-controlled House, neither bill was even brought up for a vote by the Republican-controlled Senate.

    April 2, 2014

  • Time runs out

    Two bills proposed by House Majority Leader Rocky Adkins and designed to boost the economy of this region have apparently died in the Kentucky Senate after being approved by the House of Representatives. Despite easily being approved by the Democratic-controlled House, neither bill was even brought up for a vote by the Republican-controlled Senate.

    April 2, 2014

  • Dismal numbers

    The good news is that the health ratings of all but two area counties improved in the latest ranking of the state’s 120 counties. However, before we pat ourselves on the back for those improvements, the overall health of residents of counties in northeast Kentucky remains rather dismal. Yes, we are improving but we still have a long, long way to go.

    April 2, 2014