Daily Independent (Ashland, KY)

Opinion

October 13, 2013

In Your View

ASHLAND — Tired of games politicians play

As a citizen, I wonder why our government is shut down.

I’ll tell you why: The U.S. government is being ran by corrupt leaders who are only there to fund and support “big business and the wealthy.”

A government shutdown is like euthanizing the United States as we know it.  It’s not right, not one bit right.

We have a problem in Washington, D.C. As average Americans, we’d like to stop this shutdown, but we can’t because we’re not qualified. We vote these individuals in office in hopes that somebody would stand up, not sit down. This nation has a heart, and right now, her heart is breaking.

The men and women we’ve voted for year after year, time and time again, are tearing down the walls President George Washington built. I wonder if Heaven has a 24-hour  window, and if so, I wonder what President Washington and his many successors who are with him are thinking.

I’m just one American, but like many others, I’m tired of politicians and their lobbyist friends playing games with our 246-year-old nation. It’s time to stop. Let’s call a truce, because after all, while the politicians may disagree, we’re still, “One nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all!

May God bless America!

Joshua A. Presley, Russell

The shutdown terrifies him

This is in response to the Oct. 8 letter from MSgt. (Ret.) Skip Crabtree of Russell concerning Carrie Stambaugh’s Oct. 4 column.

MSgt Crabtree sounds like a pretty smart guy and I’m just a good ol’ country boy. He used a lot of words I had to look up in the dictionary. While I had the dictionary open, I looked up “terrorist.” Terrorist, according to Webster, is “one who inspires fear” and terrorism means “a systematic use of terror especially as a means of coercion.”

I’m terrified about the shutting down of our government. So, I am pretty sure the government shutdown by the Tea Party-led Republicans qualifies as terrorism.

I also looked up anarchy. According to Webster, anarchy is  “a state of political disorder due to the absence of governmental authority.” The Republicans in Congress will not pay our bills, effectively shutting down the U.S. government (anarchy) over a bill that was passed by the legislative branch of our government, signed by President Obama, tested in court and found to be constitutionally sound. Thus, the shutdown seems “a systematic use of terror.” Our government policy is “we do not negotiate with terrorists.”

Anyway, I also looked up invective and I have come to the conclusion that “terrorist” and “anarchist” fits certain Republicans.

My parents have a fixed income and were spending about one third of their yearly income on medical expenses. Under the new health care system, their Humana premium would drop from $113.88 each to $48 each. A saving of $790.56 per year. That’s a lot of money to my parents.

The real issue is the Tea Party and Koch Brothers Republicans are going to stifle and already slow recovery by letting us go into default over a bill that has nothing to do with the payment of our bills.

Jack Maggard, Ashland

Text Only
Opinion
  • What's next?

    While virtually all cities in northeastern Kentucky provide their residents with some utility services — water and sewer, mainly, and sometimes natural gas — to the best of our knowledge, Olive Hill is the only town in the FIVCO‚Äąregion with its own electrical company.
     

    April 13, 2014

  • 'Waited too long'

    Lt. Garlin Murl Conner left the U.S. Army as the second-most decorated soldier during World War II, earning four Silver Stars, four Bronze Stars, seven Purple Hearts and the Distinguished Service Cross for his actions during 28 straight months in combat.

    April 12, 2014

  • Enact HB 3

    The National Rx Drug Abuse Summit is under way hundreds of miles from eastern Kentucky in Orlando, Fla., but the three-day conference which runs through Thursday, was organized by Operation UNITE, the eastern Kentucky anti-drug group that knows all too well the devastating impact the prescription drug epidemic continues to have on this region.

    April 11, 2014

  • State officials cease efforts to stop advance of ash borer

    Kentucky’s war against the tiny emerald ash borer responsible for already killing more than 25 million ash trees in the eastern United States has ended in surrender — by state officials, not the tiny insect.

    April 8, 2014

  • Demise of apparel industry in Kentucky continues

    The steady demise of the once thriving clothing industry in small Kentucky towns continues with the latest factory to announce it is shutting down being one of the largest: Fruit of the Loom has announced it is closing its last remaining plant in Jamestown, a move that eventually will see the elimination of more than 600 jobs in the small town near Lake Cumberland.

    April 7, 2014

  • None on ballot

    The 2014 Kentucky General Assembly considered an unusually high number of proposed amendments to the Kentucky Constitution on such issues as casino gambling, the restoration of voting rights for convicted felons and the elimination of state and local elected offices.

    April 4, 2014

  • In Your View

    Letters to the editor

    April 3, 2014

  • Time runs out

    Two bills proposed by House Majority Leader Rocky Adkins and designed to boost the economy of this region have apparently died in the Kentucky Senate after being approved by the House of Representatives. Despite easily being approved by the Democratic-controlled House, neither bill was even brought up for a vote by the Republican-controlled Senate.

    April 2, 2014

  • Time runs out

    Two bills proposed by House Majority Leader Rocky Adkins and designed to boost the economy of this region have apparently died in the Kentucky Senate after being approved by the House of Representatives. Despite easily being approved by the Democratic-controlled House, neither bill was even brought up for a vote by the Republican-controlled Senate.

    April 2, 2014

  • Dismal numbers

    The good news is that the health ratings of all but two area counties improved in the latest ranking of the state’s 120 counties. However, before we pat ourselves on the back for those improvements, the overall health of residents of counties in northeast Kentucky remains rather dismal. Yes, we are improving but we still have a long, long way to go.

    April 2, 2014