Daily Independent (Ashland, KY)

Opinion

February 14, 2013

In Your View

ASHLAND — Program changed for the better

The Independent recently published an article about Morehead University’s northeast Kentucky best small business awards program. This program has been changed this year for the better.

Previously some winners were not the best small business but rather the best in promoting their business through volunteer work. The previous system was flawed in that a full 40 percent of their total score was determined in this fashion.

This year the score for a business is determined primarily by its business activities, not extracurricular activities. This year’s formula is made up by four separate categories of 25 percent each. They are as follows:

1. Increase in sales, evidence of potential revenue growth, financial strength

2. Creating jobs, evidence of potential for future hiring

3. Increase in sales, evidence of potential revenue growth — financial strength

4. Divided into three areas: (1) involvement and support within the community, including  evidence of owner and/or employee contributions to enhance community (use of personal time and resources, volunteering, etc); (2) response to adversity and/or creative methods to remain competitive, and (3) innovativeness of product or service.

Basically, as explained to me last year, the fourth category (volunteerism) made up the 40 percent mentioned above. This year that category would be only about 8 percent of the total score and much more fair for those businesses running a business and not a popularity contest.

 There are other changes this year as well, including limiting the number of employees to 100 and sales not more than $10 million. This will eliminate some previous entrants who could not win against the 40 percent criteria but could have won with the current rules before they outgrew them.

These changes were necessary and should be welcomed by all of our area small businesses.

William B. Secrest,  Argentum

‘Human’ cost of tax hike is great

What is the “human” cost of adding a 3 percent utility tax on Westwood residents?

Think of how those that are not employed, or only working part time, are going to pay another $15 to $20 every month just for their utilities. This tax will increase every year for the rest of their lives.

What will our large elderly community have to give up to pay this tax? They haven’t had raises in several years, and no more are expected.

One young tax supporter said, “I don’t believe there are widows in Westwood that only make $700 a month.” They have no idea of the realities of the people in the community. A large part of the petition signers were born before 1947. The people who are lucky enough to have a job took pay cuts and haven’t had a raise in several years. They are barely getting by.

The school board has had to admit the conditions at the high school are now being renovated and they will have a beautiful new learning facility by July 1. No utility tax is needed for this; it’s already paid for. There is no urgent need for the rest of their “wish list.”

Their revenues increased by over $800,000. last year. They have raised our property tax the maximum allowed for several years. The people are taxed for everything in their lives and are at the breaking point.

When you go to the polls on Feb. 19, please remember the effect your vote will have on the majority of the community. Think of your parents, your relatives, your neighbors. These are the ones who will bear the brunt of this tax. Please vote “yes” to stop the tax.

Joe Weis, Westwood

Text Only
Opinion
  • PAUL CHITWOOD: Ruling on same-sex marriage defies state constitution

    News that U.S. District Judge John G. Heyburn once again usurped the will of Kentucky voters is tragic and disappointing. By declaring gay marriage legal in the commonwealth, Heyburn defied the essential, foundational governing document that ensures order and justice, the Constitution of Kentucky.

    July 8, 2014

  • More difficult

    In a state like Kentucky with the number of adults who have not graduated from high school is much higher than the national average, undereducated adults have been encouraged to earn high-school equivalency degrees by studying for, taking and passing the General Educational Development (GED) test.

    May 22, 2014

  • Primary election sends messages

    The voters — or at least the minority who took the time to go to the polls Tuesday — have spoken, with Boyd County voters sending mixed messages in the county-wide races that gathered the most attention.

    May 21, 2014

  • Click it or Ticket

    "Click it or Ticket” is a phrase used so often in recent years most of us hardly give it a thought.

    May 21, 2014

  • Top trooper

    Thumbs up to Trooper First Class Shane Goodall of Flatwoods for being named 2013 Trooper of the Year for Kentucky.

    May 20, 2014

  • 05/18/2014 — This Week in the Tri-State

    Local news

    May 18, 2014

  • Magolene S. Fraley 1929-2014

    Magolene Spears Fraley, 84, of Wurtland, died Saturday in Community Hospice Care Center in Ashland.

    May 17, 2014

  • Business grant

    Morehead State graduate student Kayla Keeton, who received her undergraduate degree from MSU last spring and is now studying for her MBA at the school, has received a $5,111 grant from the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development to help her start Belles of the Bluegrass, a high-tech wedding planning business.

    May 16, 2014

  • Recovery Fest celebrates kicking addiction

    The wet weather no doubt impacted the size of the crowd at Saturday’s Recovery Fest 2014 at Veterans Riverfront Park in Ashland, but there were plenty of reasons for addicts who are now drug free to celebrate and for speakers like State Sen. Robin Webb, D-Grayson, and others to talk about the impact the prescription drug epidemic has had on this region and for others to distribute literature and offer words of encouragement that could convince some to seek help in their battle with their drug addictions.

    May 13, 2014

  • In Your View 5/13/14

    Letters to the editor:

    May 13, 2014