Daily Independent (Ashland, KY)

Opinion

August 20, 2013

In Your View

ASHLAND — Drug problems are already here

In regards to the current controversy in Boyd County, it seems some in the Cedar Knoll area do not want a substance abuse residential treatment program in their neighborhood. The quotes in the paper suggest the program would lead to a reduction in property values and an increase in crime in their area.  I spent a few minutes doing some research on the Internet and came up with these statistics:

(1) According to the Kentucky State Police sex offender registry, there are 22 registered sex offenders within a five-mile radius of Kyova Mall.

(2) According to google.com, the population of Boyd County is 49,466 for the calendar year of 2011. And according to the federal office of drug abuse, 8.7 percent of the population have used an illicit drug. Using that average and the county population, it is a safe assumption that 4,304 in Boyd County use illicit drugs.   That is a sizeable number who could be addicted and commit crimes to provide the drugs for their addiction.  They may be committing acts of violence while under the influence of the drugs, and/or operatomg a motor vehicle under the influence, etc.

According to crime statistics, recordspedia.com, there were 10, 521 crimes committed in Boyd County from 1999 to 2008, or 1,169 crimes per year

I would suggest Boyd County welcome the addition of a substance abuse treatment program to our community, because the problems you wish to avoid in denying this center are already here!

Keith Frazier, Ashland

Bike night was a family affair

It’s a right in this country to voice your opinions, but it would be so grand if you had  your facts before expressing them. This is in regard to  the Catlettsburg Giovanni’s Bike Night of which I have been at the last four or five.

My band and I have faced what small crowds have been there, from 7 to 10 Friday nights. Not once has there been a complaint, an argument, nor has anybody interferred with while doing business at this family-owned and service-minded business. Here is a complete run down of the crowd Friday night at the Eddie and the Cougars show: four ladies with a DD, which stands for designated driver and a couple who came to the show didn’t have a drink; I’ve known them as Mom and Dad all my life.

Our former lead guitar player, who is a stroke patient, was driven by his wife (DD) and his dughter. There also were two fellows who stopped in for a pizza and a beer. Three guys drank a few beers and sang along with their family before being driven home by a DD.

That was the crowd. Bands buy their own drinks. Our band has a harmonica player who has a DD , our drummer and guitar player didn’t drink. I’m taking antibiotics so I didn’t drink. Our bass player had a beer with dinner and played for two hours while sipping lemonaide.

 The city policeman who stopped in didn’t have any problem with us.

Our harmonica player is Independent writer Tim Preston. I believe in local papers and the truth.

Eddie Riffe, Eddie and The Cougars, Ashland

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Opinion
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    Lt. Garlin Murl Conner left the U.S. Army as the second-most decorated soldier during World War II, earning four Silver Stars, four Bronze Stars, seven Purple Hearts and the Distinguished Service Cross for his actions during 28 straight months in combat.

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  • In Your View

    Letters to the editor

    April 3, 2014

  • Time runs out

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    April 2, 2014

  • Time runs out

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