Daily Independent (Ashland, KY)

Local News

September 3, 2013

Prosecutor retires after 46 years

Patrick Malloy successfully tried many cases during his time in office

LEXINGTON — An assistant U.S. Attorney who successfully prosecuted cases involving coal mine officials, insurance executives, doctors, sheriffs and mayors in eastern Kentucky, Texas and Idaho has decided to call it a career after 46 years.

Patrick Molloy, 74, began as an Assistant U.S. Attorney in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of in 1967. He served as U.S. Attorney from 1977 to 1981 During that time, the office prosecuted several sheriffs for extortion and mail fraud.    

Molloy was the commonwealth’s attorney in Fayette County from 1972 to 1977 and he briefly served as interim U.S. Attorney in Idaho in 1993. He also was an Assistant U.S. Attorney in Houston for approximately five years and was engaged in the private practice of law for a few years as well.

Molloy educated authorities in several eastern European countries on ways to improve their judicial system. On those international trips, he and others encouraged authorities to develop money-laundering laws and create methods for law enforcement to legally seize assets obtained by criminals through unlawful means.

“When I started out, we basically had three types of cases in eastern Kentucky — moonshine, property theft and Social Security fraud,” Molloy said. “The types of cases we prosecute today are much more complicated. The most rewarding part of the job was getting to learn about a variety of professions through the cases I had. I will miss the people I worked with.”

“Pat’s career stands as a shining example of everything public service should be,” said U.S. Attorney Kerry B. Harvey. “He has made enormous contributions to his community and his nation. Simply put, our communities are better places because of the skill, dedication and unwavering commitment to the cause of justice that he has brought to every case he has touched over a stellar career. Although he leaves us for a well-earned retirement, his example remains for those who continue the work.”

One of Molloy’s more noteworthy prosecutions in the Ashland Division of the Eastern District was that of Keith Hollingworth, a former deputy jailer and maintenance man at the Carter County Detention Center who was convicted in 2010 of sexually abusing female inmates in violation of their civil rights and sentenced to 44 months in prison.

Some of Molloy’s other prominent cases include:

‰U.S. vs. Manalapan. Earlier this year, a Harlan County coal company and several officials pleaded guilty to violating mandatory mine safety standards. The court imposed a $150,000 fine on Manalapan Mining Company, Inc., which represents the largest criminal fine for a coal company in the Eastern District dating back at least two decades.

‰U.S. vs. Parker,  In 1983, Molloy prosecuted a waterboarding case that occurred on U.S. soil. The defendants, a rural Texas sheriff and three others, were convicted of torturing suspects in a fashion similar to waterboarding. Some of the suspects who were subjected to torture were arrested on false pretenses.

‰U.S. vs. Madon. Former Pineville Mayor Bob Madon and his son, Brent Madon, pleaded guilty in 2009 to a conspiracy to buy votes in a mayoral election.

‰U.S. vs. Kelco. In March 2003, a viatical company in Lexington, its CEO, president and vice president were convicted of a conspiracy to sell fraudulent life insurance policies. The company executives paid terminally ill people to lie about their health on life insurance applications in order to obtain a policy. The defendants then sold the policies to unsuspecting third parties.

‰U.S. vs. Singleton. Earlier this year, Molloy served as a co-counsel in a case in which a pain clinic owner was convicted of operating pill mills in Georgetown and Dry Ridge. The doctors at these clinics unlawfully distributed pills to thousands of Kentucky patients.

KENNETH HART can be reached at khart@dailyindependent.com or (606) 326-2654.

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