Daily Independent (Ashland, KY)

Local News

June 25, 2013

There’s Always magic in the air

The Kids Summer Camp at PAC teaches singing, dancing and acting

ASHLAND — On the second floor of the Paramount Arts Center, several young, aspiring actresses are sharing their inspiration as they learn more about their craft during the center’s summer camp.

Kids Summer Camp got under way June 10, with classes that included theater, crafts, art, dance and modeling.

This week, classes continue those themes with the basics of acting, Fun with Clay, Barnyard Dance, crafting and Best of Broadway, which is where the actresses could be found Monday afternoon learning the song “Naughty” from the musical “Matilda.” The sheet music was stacked on a table, and education assistant and voice instructor Joshua Jannotta was preparing to show a video of the Tony performance of the song when the participants talked about why they wanted to attend the camp.

“I have loved to sing and dance and act since I was 5,” Katlyn Brumfield, now a freshman at South Point High School, said.

Gracie Holmes, a 9-year-old at Fairview Elementary, said she, too, has always enjoyed performing.

Eleven-year-old Shaylin Lewis knows she wants to be on Broadway.

“I know someone who is a Broadway actor and has told me all about it,” the Hager Elementary School student said. “That’s exactly what I want to do.”

MacKenzie Lee, 8, a student at Hager Elementary School, said she’s preparing to audition for the play “Rug Rats.”

All the actresses love singing, dancing and acting and will get their opportunity to hone their skills this week during the session that will teach current Broadway hits and classics, culminating in a performance on Friday, the final day of this week’s camps.

Education/Outreach Director Melanie Cornelison said the Paramount has offered camps for many years but expanded camp to multiple weeks about four years ago, offering more variety, including crafts and visual arts.

She said between 80 to 150 campers will attend per week.

There also is a two-week Production Camp, which culminates in a performance of “101 Dalmatians” at 7 p.m. July 19,

“Children will learn how to do choreography, they’ll learn songs, blocking scenes, set design, makeup,” she said, noting the camp booked up quickly. Many attendees hope to audition for a Paramount Players show in the future, and some have already participated in Paramount Players but want to learn more.

Cornelison sald this year, the camp also has added another acting class for those 12 to 16. The session, which is from July 8 through 12, aims at improv.

“It’s a more in-depth class that will show children how to create a character and how to bring it to life,” she said.

Meanwhile, around the corner at Ashland Regional Dance Theatre, children 5 to 10 assemble to learn a few dance moves in the class called 1, 2, 3 Hip, 5, 6, 7 Hop.

Instructor Kaitlyn Kincade said although the class is about hip hop, she is starting students with a few jazz steps.

“They need to learn the basic movements before they learn the bigger moves,” Kincade said. “Then they can learn how to make it their own because hip hop is about being creative. We just want them to have fun and express themselves.”

She said it’s exciting to see so many 5- and 6-year-olds interested in dance.

“When they’re interested this young, they are more likely to stay interested as they get older,” she said.

All the while, yet another group of children are quietly enjoying a session called Pinterest Party. Led by Kelsey Craig, the eight crafters sit in silence, making designs on bandanas. It’s the first day and they’re already on their second project — the first was sand art in a bottle.

“At the end of the week, we’ll have an exhibit of their work,” Craig said.

Camp continues:

‰July 8 through 12 includes crafts focusing on Japanese culture, sign language, intro to improvisation, creative movement, acting theories, origami and jewelry making.

‰July 15 through 19 includes drawing, crafts focusing on “girly” items, creative movement, dance with an emphasis on a princess theme and an art class that includes drawing, painting, printing and collage.

Cornelison said the only class that’s full is the production class; those who wish to attend any other classes may register at the Paramount’s box office or call the box office at (606) 324-3175.

LEE WARD can be reached at lward@dailyindependent.com or (606) 326-2661.

1
Text Only
Local News
  • Local briefs: 4/25/14

    The city’s annual Arbor Day tree seedling giveaway will take place from noon to 6 p.m. today, or until all seedlings are gone, whichever comes first, at Central Park.

    April 24, 2014

  • Grimes goes on attack over McConnell jobs comment

    Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate Alison Lundergan Grimes is castigating incumbent Republican U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell for telling a Beattyville newspaper editor that it’s not his job to bring jobs to Lee County.

    April 24, 2014

  • City to seek proposals for floating restaurant

    The Ashland Board of City Commissioners on Thursday voted to advertise for proposals to locate a floating restaurant on the city’s riverfront.

    April 24, 2014

  • Luallen says no to 2015 governor’s race

    After months of deliberation, former state Auditor of Public Accounts Crit Luallen announced Thursday she will sit out the 2015 race for governor.

    April 24, 2014

  • BREAKING: APD probes gun report near Blazer campus

    April 24, 2014

  • Judge denies renewed motion to dismiss Rosen lawsuit

    A judge has refused to dismiss a former Boyd district and circuit judge’s lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of a law that affects his ability to run for re-election this fall.
    In an order entered on Friday, Franklin Circuit Judge Thomas D. Wingate denied a renewed motion to dismiss by current Boyd Circuit Judge George W. Davis III, an intervening respondent in the suit filed in January by Marc I. Rosen.

    April 23, 2014

  • Ashland football players join special-needs students for prom

    The purple chiffon gown and the sparkling tiara are back in the closet four days after the big dance, but Karina McBride still hasn’t stopped talking about Saturday night — the decorations, boys bringing her cups of punch, her first kiss (on the cheek, her mother hastens to interject), and dancing the night away at her first prom.
    “She’s been flying high since that night,” said Michele Woods, who is Karina’s mother and who brought together friends and volunteers to organize a prom for special needs students.

    April 23, 2014

  • Concrete pouring at Putnam

    Workers are pouring concrete foundations at Putnam Stadium and once those are dry and cured will be ready to install seats at the historic arena.
    The workers are putting in 12-hour shifts to keep on schedule to complete the stadium’s reconstruction in time for this fall’s football opener, said site supervisor Craig Chinn of Trace Creek Construction.
    The most visible work is happening on the home-team side of the stadium, where workers Tuesday were setting forms for the cylindrical concrete piers that will support the seats. Once those are poured, cured and inspected they will add the seats.

    April 23, 2014

  • Unique races for Carter magistrates

    Carter County magistrate ballots are full of candidates eager to represent constituents in each of the five districts that make up the county’s fiscal court.
     

    April 23, 2014

  • Martin County marks 50 years since LBJ visit

    Today marks 5o years since former U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson visited Inez resident Tom Fletcher and promised to end poverty in America on April 24, 1964. On Friday, Inez will be commemorating the occasion with a special event.

    April 23, 2014

Featured Ads
Seasonal Content
AP Video
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide
AP basketball
SEC Zone