Daily Independent (Ashland, KY)

Local News

February 1, 2014

Lining up for water

City manager: Positive developments in water crisis

ASHLAND — While cautioning there was still a long way to go before the city’s water crisis could be considered over, City Manager Ben Bitter on Friday said there were positive developments to report.

In one of his two daily media briefings on the situation, Bitter said city workers had managed to restore service to about 500 customers on the Ashland system and progress was being made on getting the other 3,500 or so still without water back online.

Bitter also said the Skyline Drive water storage tank, which had been refilling at a rate of only 7 pounds per square inch, was now refilling at 60 PSI thanks in part to “a work-around” that involves using a fire truck to draw water from another tank via a fire hydrant on Boy Scout Road and pumping it into the Skyline tank.

The downside of that, Bitter said, is that it necessitated the closure of Boy Scout Road between Greenbriar Road and Azalea Drive.

The road has been barricaded at the work site and could be closed for three to five days, according to the Kentucky Department of Highways. Until it is reopened, motorists should detour using Ky. 168 and U.S. 60, local routes, or in the following manner:

For access along Boy Scout Road up to the Greenbriar Road intersection, reroute from the Ky. 168 side.

For access along Boy Scout Road up to Azalea Drive, reroute from the U.S. 60 side.

Those who have water remain under a systemwide boil-water advisory, and Bitter said there was no way of knowing when that will be lifted. However, he did say it would likely take several days for the system to be pressurized adequately enough to allow that.

For those who don’t want to go through the trouble of boiling water, potable water is available at the Ashland Water Plant at 4040 Winchester Ave. Residents are welcome to bring containers and fill and refill them as often as necessary, Bitter said.

Also, the city is continuing to distribute bottled water at Central Park and Ashland Community and Technical College. As of Friday, Bitter said the city had given out an estimated 250,000 bottles of water.

Bitter said city officials were still urging those who have water service to conserve as much as possible. That will allow the tanks to refill quicker and enable the city to restore service to those with low pressure and no pressure, he said.

Bitter said the city had received numerous reports of car washes operating and people washing  cars during the water crisis. While saying he didn’t believe that was the wisest use of water and that it definitely wasn’t in keeping with the conservation request, he also said he doubted the city would take legal action to force the car wash owners to shut down until the situation passes.

“We have talked to our legal department about our options, but our preference would be to let the business owners run their businesses,” he said.

The city of Russell also is under a water-conservation notice, issued Thursday by Mayor Bill Hopkins. According to Hopkins, the city’s water supplies have dropped to “dangerously low levels, and we must conserve water to rebuild inventories.”

The Greenup water district on Friday set up bottled water distribution to its customers with no water. Water may be picked up at the Greenup Fire Department, and Greenup Mayor Lundie Meadows said customers need to provide water bill stubs to receive water. Also, each household will be limited to two cases of water, he said.

KENNETH HART can be reached at khart@dailyindependent.com or (606) 326-2654.

1
Text Only
Local News
  • 0723bcfair0083.jpg Boyd County Fair in full swing

    Arriving at the Boyd County Fairgrounds last night, ears were filled with the sounds of children’s laughter, grown-up chatter and the screams of those individuals brave enough to partake of the weathered rides.

    July 22, 2014 4 Photos

  • Cans, trailer and moving dollies reported stolen to APD

    A thief targeted recyclables in a heist at the Pollard Place group home Friday.

    July 22, 2014

  • McConnell co-sponsors bill to protect correctional officers

    U.S. Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell co-sponsored legislation to help protect correctional officers and staff at Federal Bureau of Prison facilities.

    July 22, 2014

  • School discrimination suit settled

    A former Greenup County schools custodian has settled his federal racial discrimination suit against the school district, but the terms will not be made public.

    July 22, 2014

  • Family trip detour provides military thrill for 10-year-old

    Jeremy Crawford’s idea of a good time is a seat beside his papaw, watching their favorite World War II movies.

    July 22, 2014

  • Highlands marks year of progress

    This time last year, the Highlands Museum and Discovery Center was facing an eviction notice. Now, the museum is celebrating a year’s worth of progress where not only does it have ownership of its Winchester Avenue building, but is seeing an upswing in exhibition attendance.

    July 22, 2014

  • First lady recognizes Morehead

    Kentucky first lady Jane Beshear said Morehead’s achievement in finally reaching Trail Town certification exemplifies the strength and dedication of the small town community during her address Tuesday at the Rowan County Arts Center.

    July 22, 2014

  • Local in brief: 7/23/14

    The inaugual Ride for Autism will be Aug. 23, starting and ending at Callihan’s American Pub & Grill at the Kyova Mall, including a stop at Carter Caves State Resort Park.

    July 22, 2014

  • 0723trailtown.jpg First lady recognizes Morehead Trail Town status

    Kentucky first lady Jane Beshear said Morehead’s achievement in finally reaching “Trail Town” certification exemplifies the strength and dedication of the small town community during her address Tuesday at the Rowan County Arts Center.

    July 22, 2014 1 Photo

  • McConnell co-sponsors bill to protect correctional officers

    U.S. Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell co-sponsored legislation to help protect correctional officers and staff at Federal Bureau of Prison (BOP) facilities.

    July 22, 2014