Daily Independent (Ashland, KY)

Local News

July 28, 2013

Recovery Kentucky coming to Boyd

Center will serve 100 men with four-phase recovery program

ASHLAND — Public cries for a local longterm addiction recovery center to help address the region’s drug epidemic have been answered.

Officials with Pathways announced Recovery Kentucky will build a longterm supportive housing and recovery facility in Boyd County near the Kyova Mall. The center will serve 100 adult men using a proven four-phase recovery program based on the 12 steps.

Construction on the Genesis Recovery Kentucky Center is expected to get under way in early spring with a tentative opening date in the spring of 2015. The Boyd facility will be one of four new centers planned statewide, which will bring the number of Recovery Kentucky facilities to 14.

Recovery Kentucky is a joint effort of the Department for Local Government, the Department for Corrections and the Kentucky Housing Corporation, which began under former Gov. Ernie Fletcher’s administration. The goal is to “help Kentuckians recover from substance abuse, which often leads to chronic homelessness.”

Pathways will provide the programing for the new center, as it does at the Morehead Inspiration Center, which opened in 2007.

Pathways CEO Kim McClanahan said a variety of local officials and citizens have been advocating for a local Recovery center for many years.

 “We need treatment. Where is the treatment? We hear that every day,” said McClanahan. “We need some place to put people and there have been community groups that have come together to say ‘How do we get a treatment center here?’ So, it is clearly a profound need that we believe Pathways is well positioned to meet in terms with our experience with the Morehead center and in general with addiction.” 

“I think it would be safe to say, virtually everyone knows someone in active addiction these days. Our goal with this project and with our addiction services at Pathways, I think, is that everyone virtually will know someone in longterm sustained recovery in the very near future,” said Scott Campbell, Pathway’s director of regional support services.

“It has been determined that this is a model program. That is why the state has put so much effort into replicating it in both the rural and urban areas of Kentucky,” he said. A typical Recovery Kentucky client resides in the facility for a period of nine to 12 months with a maximum stay of two years.

During that time, clients move through four phases of the program that incorporates a social model of recovery, peer support, accountability, daily living skills, job responsibilities and practical living experiences.

“We have really been amazed at the success we see at the men who go through the program,” said Campbell. “These programs save money for the citizens. They put recovered individuals back into the community as tax paying citizens.”

Recovery Kentucky results are proven, according to officials. A study of the state's 10 centers, completed by the University of Kentucky Center on Drug and Alcohol Research and released earlier this year, say clients reported improvements in substance abuse, mental health, economic status, living situation and involvement with the criminal justice system after going through the program.

Clients were interviewed 12 months after entering the program, and results were compared to their intake interviews. The study found rates of illegal drug abuse dropped 93 percent and 88 percent reported a decrease in criminal justice involvement. At intake, 73 percent of clients reported an arrest in the previous 12 months before the program, at followup this had decreased to 9 percent.

The UK study also estimated for every dollar spent on recovery services, there was a $3.73 return in avoided societal costs including those associated with the criminal justice system.

Recovery Kentucky centers provide treatment at no cost to clients, who are referred into the program via a variety of means. To qualify, clients must be at least 18 years of age, male and homeless or marginally housed with a history of addiction. Clients must have no history of sexual misconduct or violent behavior or an uncontrolled mental illness. They must be able to physically participate in the program, be capable of living in a group environment and not have had any court dates within 30 days.

CARRIE STAMBAUGH can be reached at (606) 326-2653 or by cstambaugh@dailyindependent.com

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