Daily Independent (Ashland, KY)

Local News

February 3, 2013

Through good and bad, troopers are brothers

GRAYSON — An Eastern Kentucky University Colonel, Tye Chavies was hopeful he might be picked to be a Kentucky State Police trooper — so he looked to his college buddies for a hand to make it happen.

A detective was on his way to interview Chavies at their apartment. His pals made sure their place was spick and span and ready for distinguished company, he remembers, with an easygoing chuckle.

“My family and friends played a significant role in helping me achieve my lifelong dream of becoming a state trooper. From childhood days playing cops and robbers, all the way through my direction in school, my family and friends knew my goals and dreams,” said the 24-year-old Queen City native.

“I wouldn’t have done it without the love, support and encouragement I received from them on both easy days and even the toughest of days. Because I work away I don’t always get to see them and speak with them, but, ultimately, they’re my rock.”

Chavies carries fraternal heart into every shift. He listens intently to his radio; hears a partner unit on a chancy call. “It’s always in the back of my head as I listen to him. If he’s in trouble, I head his way,” he said. “He’s my best friend.”

On a recent night he united with Carter County KSP troopers for help in an unstable meth lab takedown, wrenching the suspect from underneath a bed. He chronicles cases of Mississippi felon apprehensions and risky car chases. Priming in his home’s stillness shores and settles him for such nights. It takes Chavies more than an hour to put attire in order — buffing brass buttons, ironing gray woolen and shining patent shoes. Exactitude and attention to detail are a KSP tradition.

“I take pride in this uniform. I make sure it looks as good as the men and women who wore it years before me,” he said. “It’s an institution and legacy.”

Learning he was accepted into the academy he proudly told his parents he would soon pack up and head off — oblivious of stringency ahead. The 23 weeks were the “toughest of my life,” he said.

“Nonstop demand for discipline, academics and physical training takes a toll on any person. Many people say they want to become a trooper, but only a few understand the drive and dedication it takes to see that through,” Chavies said. “The training I received from the Kentucky State Police is like no other. I’m confident in my abilities and prepared to see whatever comes through that radio because of the people who trained me from Day 1 of the academy through my time in field training.

“Everything they do is for a reason. You don’t ask why — you just do it.”

Chavies doesn’t know what this night will hold. By hook or by crook, he lives up to his characterization of hero: “Someone willing to do what’s necessary to get the job done. You go completely, fearlessly. The people I work with are my biggest heroes,” said Chavies, who has a bachelor’s degree in police studies, coupled with minors in political science and homeland security. Being a trooper is taxing. It changed Chavies.

“Even when I’m not on the clock I’m always working. I wonder what my fellow troopers are doing at work and I think about important cases. I find myself quick to help others when they’re in need and skeptical of some people most wouldn’t even consider.

“It’s hard to describe the ways becoming a trooper changed me, but I’m yet to find one change I didn’t like. Every day of my life revolves around KSP. There’s just something special about being a trooper.”

1
Text Only
Local News
  • Local counties see drop in unemployment

    Boyd County was one of 117 counties that saw a decrease in its unemployment rate between June 2013 and June 2014.
     

    July 27, 2014

  • 0726bigboy.JPG Big Boy to open Aug. 11

    The long-awaited Frisch’s Big Boy restaurant will open Aug. 11, and when it does it will be business as usual from day one: the eatery will open its doors to the early breakfast crowd at 6:30.

    July 27, 2014 1 Photo

  • SOAR meeting at MSU Aug. 6

    Morehead State University and St. Claire Regional Medical Center will present Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and U.S. Rep. Hal Rogers as part of a "Health Impact Series" under the new Shaping Our Appalachian Region initiative.
     

    July 27, 2014

  • MSU moving business admin. program online

    Morehead State University’s School of Business Administration has announced its bachelor of business administration degree in computer information systems has moved totally online beginning the fall 2014 semester.
     

    July 27, 2014

  • Thefts, fraud reported to APD

    The following information was taken from Ashland Police Department reports:
     

    July 27, 2014

  • Raceland couple join Peace Corps

    A couple from Raceland will travel to the Republic of Botswana on Aug. 10 to begin training as volunteers in the Peace Corps.

    July 27, 2014

  • Missing Boyd inmate returns to jail

    The Boyd County inmate who walked away from a work detail on Saturday turned himself back in to the Boyd County Detention Center on Sunday.

    July 27, 2014

  • 0728MoreheadMusic_1457.jpg Hills alive with Old Time Music

    The hills surrounding Morehead were alive again this weekend with the sounds of fiddles, banjos and deep Appalachian voices that help keep old time mountain music alive in a modern world.

    July 27, 2014 2 Photos

  • Bill Clinton coming to eastern Kentucky to stump for Grimes

    By RONNIE ELLIS
    CNHI News Service

    GLASGOW — Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes is again calling in the “Big Dog” in her quest to unseat five-term Republican U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell.

    July 27, 2014

  • Tim Preston: Veterans, doughnuts, hog legs and jerky of squid: 7/27/14

    Are there any talented wreath makers reading this column?

    July 27, 2014