Daily Independent (Ashland, KY)

Local News

October 13, 2012

Romney seeks Ohio votes as Obama preps for debate

PORTSMOUTH, Ohio — Republicans Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan went back to school on Saturday to rally college students in all corners of all-important Ohio and hammer at President Barack Obama for going easy on China over unfair trade practices. Obama took precious time off the campaign trail to practice for the next debate against his GOP rival.

It was an unspoken acknowledgment of the importance that Obama attaches to upping his game in Debate No.2 that the president is largely dropping out of sight for five straight days in the final weeks of the race to prepare for Tuesday's encounter in Hempstead, N .Y.

Even while cloistered for debate prep at a sprawling resort in Williamsburg, Va., though, the president didn't completely cede the spotlight to Romney. His weekly radio and Internet address highlighted the Obama administration's work to revive the U.S. auto industry — a message aimed squarely at working-class voters in manufacturing-heavy states like Ohio.

Romney, for his part, told a crowd of more than 3,000 people at Shawnee State University in Portsmouth that Obama was ducking an important decision on whether China is manipulating its currency to gain a trade advantage. A decision was due on Monday, but the Treasury Department said Friday the decision won't come until after global finance officials meet in early November. That means a decision is unlikely before the Nov. 6 election.

"It's time for us to stand up to China for their cheating," Romney declared. "It's got to stop."

Romney framed the issue squarely as a matter of jobs, saying cheap Chinese products were driving American companies out of business.

"We've got to get those jobs back and make trade to be fair," Romney declared.

Ryan, too, criticized the administration for failing to hold China accountable for its trade practices. During a morning appearance in northeastern Ohio at Youngstown State University, he told a crowd of about 1,400 that his hometown of Janesville, Wis., was much like theirs — a "blue-collar, factory town" where the struggles of the auto industry hit home hard.

Text Only
Local News