Daily Independent (Ashland, KY)

Editorials

April 12, 2014

'Waited too long'

Garlin Conner's military service remains heroic

ASHLAND — Lt. Garlin Murl Conner left the U.S. Army as the second-most decorated soldier during World War II, earning four Silver Stars, four Bronze Stars, seven Purple Hearts and the Distinguished Service Cross for his actions during 28 straight months in combat. But despite backing from congressmen, military veterans and historians, he never received the Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest military distinction, awarded for life-risking acts of valor above and beyond the call of duty.

The 17-year request by Conner’s wife, Pauline, who lives in Albany, to have the Medal of Honor  awarded to her late husband,  has apparently come to an end as the result of a ruling by U.S. District Judge Thomas B. Russell of Kentucky. In a recent 11-page opinion,  Russell ruled a  technicality will prevent Pauline Conner from continuing her campaign on behalf of her husband, who died in 1998. Russell concluded Pauline Conner waited too long to present new evidence to the U.S. Army Board of Correction of Military Records, which rejected her bid to alter her husband’s service record.

Russell praised Conner’s “extraordinary courage and patriotic service,” but said there was nothing he could do for the family. “Dismissing this claim as required by technical limitations in no way diminishes Lt. Conner’s exemplary service and sacrifice,” Russell wrote.

Richard Chilton, a former Green Beret and amateur military historian who has researched Conner’s service, said Conner deserves the Medal of Honor. Chilton pledged to get resolutions from lawmakers and veterans’ groups in all 50 states in an attempt to get Congress to act on Conner’s behalf.

“I want to make sure they can’t walk away from this,” Chilton told The Associated Press after Russell’s ruling. “He’s a man worthy of this.”

Roughly 3,400 have received the Medal of Honor since it was created in 1861, including actor Audie Murphy, the most decorated U.S. soldier in World War II. Murphy fought in the same areas as Conner and went on to star in dozens of Hollywood films, most of them Westerns and war epics.

Conner served with the 3rd Infantry Division, which fought in France and Europe in 1945. The Army in 2001 named Eagle Base in Bosnia-Herzegovina after Conner, who lived in Clinton County after his years in the military and served 17 years as president of the Clinton County Farm Bureau.

Conner’s citation for the Distinguished Service Cross states on Jan. 24, 1945, near Houssen, France, he slipped away from a military hospital with a hip wound to rejoin his unit rather than return home to Kentucky and unreeled a telephone wire, plunged into a shallow ditch in front of the battle line, and directed multiple rounds of fire for three hours as German troops continued their offensive, sometimes getting within five yards of Conner’s position.

The board first rejected Conner’s application in 1997 on its merits and turned away an appeal in June 2000, saying at the time no new evidence warranted a hearing or a new decoration despite more than a dozen letters of support for Conner.

In the years that followed, lawmakers in Kentucky, Tennessee and three other states passed resolutions backing the effort to see Conner receive the Medal of Honor. After Chilton found three eyewitness accounts to Conner’s deeds in 2006, Pauline Conner resubmitted the case to the board in 2008 — two years after the statute of limitations expired.

A bipartisan group of current and former members of Congress has backed Conner’s application in the past, including retired Sen. Bob Dole, a Kansas Republican and World War II veteran; retired Sen. Wendell Ford, a Democrat from Kentucky; and current Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky. Noted World War II historian Steven Ambrose, who died in 2002, wrote in November 2000 to support Conner’s application, saying his actions were “far above the call of duty.”

Unfortunately, efforts to award the Medal of Honor to Conner has become so political that awarding it at the late date would be so political it would taint the honor.

The record is clear: Lt. Garlin Murl Conner was a genuine war hero whose battlefield heroics in World War II helped win the war in Europe. The fact he did not receive the Medal of Honor takes nothing away from the heroic deeds of this Kentucky native.

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