Daily Independent (Ashland, KY)

CNHI News Service Originals

April 1, 2014

Sibling says Dexter drama motivated sister's 'lie' of mass murder

SUNBURY, Pa. — The older sister of a self-described teenage serial killer says her sibling fantasizes herself as a female Dexter Morgan who murders unsavory characters who have eluded authorities.

“It is a lie,” said Ashley Dean, 22, of her sister, Miranda Barbour’s claim that she killed at least 22 people in different states over the last six years, an assertion that has attracted national media attention. “She is a master at lying,” added Dean. “She takes a lot of truths and puts the lie in the middle so when people talk to her they see all these truths and then they believe the lie.”

Barbour, 19, and her husband, Elytte Barbour, 22, are charged with the stabbing and strangulation death of Troy LaFerrara, 42, of Port Trevorton, Pa., in November after he responded to her promise of female companionship in a Craigslist personal ad.

In two jailhouse interviews with the Sunbury Daily Item, Malinda Barbour stated that, driven by satanic cult beliefs, she went on a cross-country murder spree at age 13 ending with LaFerrara’s death. She complained in the second interview last week that federal authorities were not taking her claims seriously.

Inspiration for Barbour’s tall tale that she killed only “people who did bad things and didn’t deserve to be here anymore” stems from her infatuation with the “Dexter” television drama series on the cable channel Showtime, said Dean.

The sister said Barbour, 19, and her husband, Elytte Barbour, 22, were avid fans of Dexter, a Miami Metro Police blood analyst, and talked about his secret life as a serial killer.

“If you listen to what she is saying,” said Dean, “she is using descriptions from the show. Miranda is just saying these things.”

Dean said she has not spoken with her sister since she was arrested Dec. 3 for the LaFerrara murder.

But, said Dean, she did talk by phone with Elytte, the husband, who was arrested for the LaFerrara murder three days later. Police said the husband strangled LaFerrara from the back seat of the couple’s car while the wife stabbed him more than 20 times. Prosecutors have said they will seek the death penalty for both.

“I told him I would be there for him, and since he married my sister, I considered him my family, and whatever he needed I would be there,” said Dean. “But I had a feeling something wasn’t right.”

Dean, who resides in Alaska, said her sister had a sorry history of drug addiction, but still she couldn’t believe she would commit murder. Yet, she said, “My sister deserves whatever consequences she will receive for her actions.”

Details for this story were provided by the Sunbury, Pa., Daily Item.

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